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20121224
20130101
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that republicans for cutting spending. you heard mitt romney criticize president obama because he's not spending enough on ships, which we don't need, and not staying long enough in the war zones. the republicans' view of spending is very particular one. secondly, as far as the american people are concerned, people in their districts, gee, if they represent districts in new jersey and new york they want more spending. you know, people -- if you ask them they want government pending they say no. do you want to cut medicare? no, not that. how about firefighters? people boast of cutting government. when was the last time you heard them cut fire department or cut down on snow removal? in fact the republicans tend to be opposed to spending in general. when it comes to particular spending, remember paul ryan acknowledging he was seeking to get the stimulus money that he was denouncing. but in any case, it's not the democratic position we should put all of the increased revenue into spending. by the way, i believe much of government spending is very important. there are things that we need for the qual
year end tax hikes and spending cuts as president obama warns failure could mean, quote, a self-inflicted wound to the economy. mike emmanuel live. after a lot of focus on john boehner, kind of sounds like democrats and others are counting on the top senate republican to get a deal. is that about right? mitch mcconnell? >> that is spot on. this has been a lot of talk about senator mitch mcconnell's ability to be a deal maker. one area he's working on is the threshold for extending the bush tax cuts. the $250,000 mark has been what democrats have been pitching. negotiations seem to be heading toward keeping the current tax rate for those making up to $400,000, a key senate conservative sounds hopeful. >> i do think that something will happen over the next few days relative to the revenue piece and hopefully we can rescue most americans from a tax increase. but what we haven't dealt with again is the spending component. >> since it is not expected that increasing the nation's borrowing ability, the debt limit will be part of this deal, conservatives may be able to fight for spendi
we are at. if you look at spending cuts first, barack obama has basically moved about $325 billion on spending and speaker boehner, according to the last real public offer, has moved about $350 billion. i think it is fair to say had both moved relatively equally. but if you turned to tax increases, obama has already moved from, again the last public real offer $355 billion while boehner's moved only $150 billion. less than half. and then finally, and i want to go to you to unpack this. the stimulus money. this is not to be forgotten. we are in a recession. and many economists say that whatever else you do with long-term entitlement reform which is real, another real thing is growing the economy. obama has moved $250 billion. the number that boehner has moved on that stimulus is zero from the last final comprehensive offer. what do you make of that pacting that we are not mere the 50-yard line anymore? >> we also add that not only has boehner month moved, he can't get his own caucus to vote on the plan he brought forward. we are not only talking about symbolic gestures here, we are
forward a little bit more, president obama more on spending reductions including entitlement reform, he did do some and mr. boehner, speaker boehner coming forward not just $1 million having a tax raise, those earning $400,000 to $500,000, you can get the grand bargain. it's not what we are talking today. get the fiscal cliff to where you change the scale to a bunny slope, where the skier can pick up speed, accelerate the economy up to 3%, only reducing the debt reduction down 200 billion. then with the surging economy, you get $3 trillion in february before the debt limit is broken, then the economy is so strong it can take the grand compromise and roar into the next nine years. that's the grand compromise. >> i heard you use that reference of the bunny slope. we are about to hit the bunny slope as opposed to the fiscal cliff. this is from an article in the washington post. if an agreement is reached, taxes would go up a bit for the wealthy. there would be no changes to entitlement programs, medicare, social security, no grand strategy to race cash through a tax code. a fresh start for
spending. its pending home sales index for november. >> in other housing news, the obama administration is considering expanding its mortgage refinancing program to include borrowers whose mortgages are not backed by the government and who owe more than their homes are worth. "the journal" reports one proposal being considered would also transfer potentially riskier loans that are held by private investors into fannie and freddie and transferring billions of dollars of mortgages to the government-backed mortgage companies would require congressional authorization and temporarily change the charters of fannie and freddie. does that sound like something -- a kid -- >> i don't know if it's good or not. >> all the stuff that's not covered now. you need -- >> yeah -- >> put it into fannie and freddie again. expand their balance sheets. i don't know. >> you have a view? >> how much was the tie? >> i don't want to say. >> really? >> was this a christmas tie, holiday tie? >> no. getting back to your question -- >> go ahead. >> fannie and freddie. look at that -- >> beautiful tie. >> punting. he
-- these two people ran on different issues. i mean these two parties ran on different issues. president obama ran not on spending cuts, but on tax increases for the wealthy. it's something that's going to happen next monday anyway or tuesday regardless of whether the president does anything or there's a deal or not. because it's just going to expire. >> he's known that all along. >> but the republicans ran on spending cuts. so they're the ones that ran on this. why don't they put up their spending cuts? the president didn't run on that. and the irony is when he did mention spending cuts, $716 billion in medicare cuts during the campaign, mitt romney and paul ryan and all the republicans, who wanted to do the exact same thing he did, they jumped on his case for proposing cuts to medicare. so how can you negotiate with a party that isn't serious about its own caucus, and isn't capable of controlling them and doesn't have a serious plan for dealing with spending cuts on its own, because it's afraid to take the heat? nobody wants to cut spending. let's just admit that. but if we're going to do it
at the biggest punch line of all. after two years of campaigning, a record $2 billion in election spending, the angst, anxiety, where did he end up? where we started. president barack obama in the white house and a house of representatives. we can't hold it in any longer. our very last show of the year is something of an experiment. our first ever annual look back in laughter. we begin the year with the op liptic decline on the mayan calendar. why else would the republicans risk leaving the country? to be run by any of this cast of characters. they thought they would be blown to oblivion. the cookiest of this crew bowed out before 2012 got going. we feared the year might leave us without the gems of 2011, like this one from our favorite pizza man. >> you agreed with president obama on libya or not? >> okay. libya. um, um, nope, that's a different one. i gotta go back and see. all this stuff twirling around in my head. >> or maybe this one from texas governor rick perry who bailed on his presidential hopes by mid january. >> i will tell you, it's three agencies of government when i get ther
spending but no one is talking about the biggest entitlement in january that's obama care that's another trillion dollars. we cannot afford this. >> let me ask you. you've been a sort of critical voice of the tea party recently. but amy makes the point. if john boehner is not the speaker, who would be? and it seems to me that anybody who's the republican speaker right now is going to have to come to some kind of deal at some point on the fiscal stuff with obama and expose him or herself to cries of disloyalty on the right and any republican speaker will have to at some point deal with the debt ceiling which will come up in a more or so. is it possible for anybody to really be an effective republican house speaker? >> i don't envy the job but john boehner is a survivor. people forget that he had been on the leadership track rising up through the ranks and got derailed several years ago and he was able to come back. i remember seeing him at a republican event in the 'fwhooirnts in connecticut at a congressional race. he was -- he spent a decade and he may have spent two decades traveling a
, republicans say the problem is about spending and democrats say it is all about lack of revenue, how -- how does -- is that bridged in this year? can it be bridged? >> yes, it can. both president obama and speaker boehner have already begun to do a principle compromise. speaker boehner said i'm ready to raise taxes on those over a million dollars. president obama said i'm ready to have a new type of chain to consumer price index which -- impacts entitlement reform. the bipartisan national debt commission, simpson-bowles commission, said for every dollar of spending reduction, including the entitlement reform we immediate to have $1 in tax revenue. that's the principle compromise we have to have. so they are not far off. what we have to have is very simple. $4 trillion in debt reduction by this one-third, two-third division. because that gives us a sustainable debt to gdp ratio so the economy can go booming again. so i believe those two men have the economies of our nation best at heart and have to come a little closer and a little $500 billion sounds like a lot. $2.5 trillion. we have to do
go from here. if boehner and obama sat down, we would be able to come up with an agreement. >>> we looking at the most likely scenario being a partial deal and maybe spending the first few weeks in january to hammer out something more concrete and long-term? >> absolutely. what may happen and what a lot of economists and others have been predicting for a month or so is maybe we go over a cliff for a couple of days, there after they do decide to stop the tax hikes on 98% of the people. it makes it easier for republicans to then vote for that. they are not voting for a tax hike. they are voting to lower taxes on 98% of americans after we go over the cliff. after we go over the cliff, that may be what puts pressure on a number of members to coming to o to have a deal after the fact. >> on our air a few minutes ago, this is what she said about the tax increase including both boehner's plan b and the plans that are here by the white house. take a listen. >> i think it is essential that we start talking about what amount can be passed on a bipartisan basis. i am to believe she shouldn't
not support any tax increase, not a million, not over a million and we don't have enough spending cuts. >> why did he pull out? what was the most mortem on pulling out? >> i think he thought obama wasn't close enough. it's a couple hundred billion in revenues -- i mean in spending cuts that the president wanted and boehner said i can't believe that. neighbor he couldn't have pulled out because of the same guys that killed plan "b." >> shorter-term it looks like the republicans would feel that brunt politically of us going over the cliff. longer-term if you get into next year and you still have troubles and the economy is still weak, isn't the president taking a big chance here? i mean, do you get any sense that they're overplaying their hand because they won re-election? >> i agree with that. i think they are overplaying their hand a little bit. i think that the president doesn't want to have a second term overshadowed by a recession. which is actually an opportunity to get a few things done, completely over taken by this cliff. he does actually want a deal. i'm not sure he wants to go -- >> i
president obama's offer to increase taxes on top 2%, whether 400,000 or 500,000 and of some small spending changes. that seems to be all anybody is talking about right now. that may be all that we can get through. plan c seems to be the original plan a at this point. >> we are making our way through the alpha bet. thank you, guys. merry christmas, all. >> merry christmas. >> see you later. >> let's get to the nasdaq marketsite. seema mody. >> weighing here on the nasdaq on large cap tech shares, take a look at dell shares moving lower. research in motion continuing its plunge after losing roughly 20% on friday with concerns aroundity revenue service model being the key issue there. aside from that, a biotech stock on the move, a small cap but as you see a commendable run over the past six months, gaining 70%. investors piling in, in anticipation of approval. today they got that approval. however the cholesterol lowering drug will contain a boxed warning citing risk of liver toxicity. perhaps that's a reason we are 150eing that stock move lower. on to bright spots, if you can believe it, fa
for whose taxes are protected and whose goes up, the difference between president obama's proposal of 250,000, republicans at 400,000 probably. but also this idea that we can do a big deal right now. there's not enough time. and the to sequester these mandatory spending cuts to defense, there's not enough time to deal with those. that is a concern to many republicans, actually many democrats as well. that could be a final hiccup here even as we get closer on the tax question. >> so how are we supposed to do is then, christina? if we couldn't get it done at $1 million. speaker boehner couldn't get that done. is it going to look like a bipartisan agreement of over in the senate that's going to go to the house, may pass with bipartisan support and then that just makes speaker boehner look even worse than he has the past week or so? >> getting a bipartisan deal, i mean that's really an interesting question if it ends up making somebody look worse. what's interesting to me about the calculus in all of this, this little bit of political kabuki theater. in some case that's actually what it is. p
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13